Thursday, 29 June 2017

New Book | Patent Politics: Life Forms, Markets, and the Public Interest in the United States and Europe | by Shobita Parthasarathy

Patent Politics: Life Forms, Markets, and the Public Interest in the United States and Europe
by Shobita Parthasarathy, University of Chicago Press, 2017, 304 pages, ISBN: 9780226437859. 

Summary: Over the past thirty years, the world's patent systems have experienced pressure from civil society like never before. From farmers to patient advocates, new voices are arguing that patents impact public health, economic inequality, morality—and democracy. These challenges, to domains that we usually consider technical and legal, may seem surprising. But in Patent Politics, Shobita Parthasarathy argues that patent systems have always been deeply political and social.
To demonstrate this, Parthasarathy takes readers through a particularly fierce and prolonged set of controversies over patents on life forms linked to important advances in biology and agriculture and potentially life-saving medicines. Comparing battles over patents on animals, human embryonic stem cells, human genes, and plants in the United States and Europe, she shows how political culture, ideology, and history shape patent system politics. Clashes over whose voices and which values matter in the patent system, as well as what counts as knowledge and whose expertise is important, look quite different in these two places. And through these debates, the United States and Europe are developing very different approaches to patent and innovation governance. Not just the first comprehensive look at the controversies swirling around biotechnology patents, Patent Politics is also the first in-depth analysis of the political underpinnings and implications of modern patent systems, and provides a timely analysis of how we can reform these systems around the world to maximize the public interest.

Table of Contents
Introduction
Chapter One: Defining the Public Interest in the US and European Patent Systems
Chapter Two: Confronting the Questions of Life-Form Patentability
Chapter Three: Commodification, Animal Dignity, and Patent-System Publics
Chapter Four: Forging New Patent Politics Through the Human Embryonic Stem Cell Debates
Chapter Five: Human Genes, Plants, and the Distributive Implications of Patents
Conclusion
Appendix 1: Major Events Related to the US and European Life-Form Patent Controversies
Appendix 2: Methodological Note


Thursday, 1 June 2017

"Awareness Programme on Indian Foreign Policy", Indian Council of World Affairs announces the second edition of ICWA Essay Competition 2017

"Awareness Programme on Indian Foreign Policy"
Indian Council of World Affairs organizes the ICWA Essay Competition  2017 

As part of its 'Awareness Programme on Indian Foreign Policy', Indian Council of World Affairs announces the second edition of ICWA Essay Competition for school students (15-18 years) and undergraduate/ post graduate students (18-25 Years).

Topics: The young writers this year have the opportunity to demonstrate their innovative thinking on the following topic:

Junior Level (15-18 years)
  • a) What India's Foreign Policy means to Young India/ India's Foreign Policy Priorities for the Youth – (1500 words).
Senior Level (18-25 years)
  • b) Conflict, Religion and Foreign Policy (2500 words).

Eligibility Criteria: The participants must be an enrolled student in a School or graduate/post graduate degree program in a College/University from anywhere across India.

Essay Submission Date & Requirements:
  • All Essays (soft copy only) should be sent to essayicwa@gmail.com latest by 30th July 2017.
  • The entries should be submitted along with a certificate from School/Institute/College/University where the participant is currently enrolled.
  • The entries should include a separate cover page carrying the following personal information: 1)Name, 2)Father/Mother Name, 3) Class/Programme, 4) Name and Address of School/College/ University, 5) Residence Address, 6) Mobile & Landline Numbers and 7) Email Address.
Kindly Note: No personal information should be provided on the Essay sheet. The essay can be written in English or Hindi.

Awards:
  • Junior Level: (1st prize – Rs 15000), (2nd prize- Rs 10000) & (3rd prize-Rs 5000)
  • Senior level: ( 1st prize – Rs 25000), (2nd prize- Rs 15000) & (3rd prize-Rs 10000)


Wednesday, 31 May 2017

DeLCON National Workshop on Strengthening Open Access (OA) Initiatives in India | 23rd June | NBRC, Manesar, Gurgaon, India

DeLCON National Workshop on Strengthening Open Access (OA) Initiatives in India 
Date: Friday, 23rd June 2017
Venue: NBRC Auditorium, National Brain Research Centre, Manesar, Gurgaon, Haryana, India

Open Access (OA) refers to online research outputs that are free of all restrictions on access (e.g. access tolls) and free of many restrictions on use (e.g. certain copyright and license restrictions). Open access can be applied to all forms of published research output, including peer-reviewed and non peer-reviewed academic journal articles, conference papers, theses, book chapters and monographs. Open Access publications refer to the kind of literature that are freely accessible to everyone and are not bound by price and permission barriers, unlike the scientific literature published via the subscription mode. Although the concept of Open Access publication is not entirely new and has been around for several years, people have begun to realize its importance only recently. The sudden change in perceptions is largely due to the increased and easy internet usage as well as support from government, educational and research institutions, and other funding agencies. Hundreds of leading academic and research sites in over 30 countries marked the week in unique ways, and expressed their support for the advancement of knowledge through free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research. Ever since, Open Access Week has been observed internationally to help raise awareness of the potential benefits of Open Access (OA) for research, and to celebrate milestones in making OA a norm in the conduct of science and scholarship. 
The one-day workshop will focus on the need to create an enabling environment for OA in India, to promote and upscale existing OA initiatives, and to encourage the development of new OA programmes. This can be done by 'closing the circle' or linking multiple stakeholder groups, namely academicians, faculties, scientists, researchers, librarians, archivists, technologists, and policymakers, taking into account their concerns and views and providing a platform for them to advocate for a common cause. The workshop will provide a unique opportunity to academicians, librarians & stakeholders communities to pool their insights, identify and discuss key OA-related issues in the country, and create a roadmap for strengthening OA in India. 

Procedure for Registration: The workshop is open to Working Professionals such as Academicians, Faculties, Scientists Library Professionals, Information Scientists. There is no registration fee. Registration is limited to only 50 participants on "first-cum-first served basis". Registration can be sent by post to given address or by email attachment at delconconsortium@gmail.com in the given prescribed format which is available at DeLCON Website at https://delcon.gov.in For participation, registration is mandatory on confirmation of the participation. An email confirmation will be sent to Registered participants. Only registered participants will be allowed to take part in the Workshop. All the Registered participants will be provided a participation certificate, Workshop Kit, Lunch and tea. No TA/DA will be paid to the Participants for attending this workshop. No accommodation will be arranged for participants by the organizers. However, we will help in arranging Guest House / Hotel accommodation in nearby places. The last date for registration to the Workshop is June 10th 2017. 

Postal Address & Contacts: Dr. D.D. LAL, DeLCON Coordinator & Organizing Secretary, DBT's Electronic Library Consortium (DeLCON), National Brain Research Centre, NBRC, NH-08, Nainwal Mode, Manesar, Gurgaon, Haryana. Pincode : 122050, India, Tel : +91-124-2845229; 2845329; Fax : +91-124-2338909, Email : delconconsortium@gmail.com 

1. The Importance of OA in India: 
Open Access has emerged during the last decade or so as a movement and a business model whose goal is to provide free access and re-use of scientific knowledge in the form of research articles, monographs, data and related materials. Faster and wider sharing of knowledge fuels the advancement of science and, accordingly, the return of health, economic, and social benefits back to the public. By removing the barriers of price and permissions, OA publishing promotes the global flow of knowledge; improves access to 'developed-country research'; creates much-needed visibility for 'developing-country research'; and allows researchers and practitioners to access current knowledge. The idea of open access to scholarly literature is not new to India. India has a large S&T research community and Indian researchers conduct research in a wide variety of areas. India also trains a very large number of scientists and engineers. One might believe that all is well with science and technology in India. But the truth is very different. In terms of the number of papers published in refereed journals, the number of citations per paper, and the number of international awards and recognitions won, India's record is not all that encouraging. India has a vast pool of academic talent and a track record of excellence in disciplines related to science and technology, but this is at odds with the limited endowments that academic libraries receive to support scientific research. Most Indian libraries cannot afford to subscribe to key journals required by researchers and scientists. This is a serious impediment to the acquisition of knowledge, and researchers' own scholarly output is adversely impacted as a result. Another outcome of prohibitive subscription costs is the low visibility of Indian research. Academics in the region exert themselves to publish their work in well-known journals which very few of their peers can access afterwards. This leads to the poor citation of works by Indian researchers, the poor circulation of their research findings, and ultimately very limited awareness about scientific developments in the country. Thus, Indian scientists face two problems, namely, access and visibility. Both these handicaps can be overcome to a considerable extent if open access is adopted widely both within and outside the country.

2. OA Initiatives in India: 
The lack of awareness might still be an issue for Indian researchers, but there have been various nitiatives by Indian institutes, journals and publishers to make research content open. Since 2003, India has been contributing to The Directory of Open Access Journals (which contains free, full-text highquality scientific journals).The Indian Medlars Centre (IMC), has taken the pioneering step of putting Indian biomedical journals accessible on to a single platform. IMC's first bibliographic database IndMed, established in 1998, provides abstract level information from more than 70 journals. The Indian Academy of Sciences and the Indian National Science Academy are premier institutes that run vibrant publishing programmes and offer open access to their journals and papers. Bioline International is a notfor-profit collaborative effort of the University of Toronto Libraries, Canada, the Reference Center on Environmental Information, Brazil, and Bioline, UK. Bioline provides access to 14 Indian journals on their primary site as well as archives these journals at the Bioline EPrints Archive. ePrints@IISC is a repository that collects, preserves and disseminates in digital format the works of the research community of the prestigious Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore. Open J-Gate – a free database of OA journals – currently offers access to more than 4000 OA English language journals from across the world. The work of Medknow Publications, an innovative publisher of OA journals, and that of the National Institute of Technology, Rourkela are also leading Indian contributions to the OA movement. It is important that these initiatives should not operate in isolation, but should form part of a concerted effort and campaign at a national level to promote OA in India. 
In 2012–13, the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) launched a major OA initiative. ICAR has formulated an OA policy stipulating that its member institutes across the country must allow open access to their research and technical publications, books, catalogues, workshop proceedings, case studies, lecture notes and other digital objects. While these institutes will maintain their own OA repositories, ICAR is setting up a central harvester to allow 'one-stop access' to all the scientific and agricultural knowledge generated within the Council. 
Master repositories such as ICAR's, composed of a network of repositories, greatly enhance accessibility, help realize the potential of OA, and strengthen the very purpose of the OA movement in India. But while developing policies and networks at the institutional level is necessary, it is critical to entrench the idea of OA at the level of national policy. A national mandate and policy framework for OA would ensure that OA initiatives cease to operate in isolated clusters, and become part of a coherent, progressive national movement to promote the flow of knowledge.

3. DBT/DST Open Access Policy
The Department of Biotechnology ("DBT") and the Department of Science and Technology ("DST") are constituent departments within the Ministry of Science and Technology, Government of India. An important function of the DBT and DST is to support basic, translational and applied scientific research through the creation of suitable infrastructure, by providing funding to individual scientists, institutions and start-ups, and through any other means deemed necessary. Since all funds disbursed by the DBT and DST are public funds, it is important that the information and knowledge generated through the use of these funds are made publicly available as soon as possible, subject to Indian law and IP policies of respective funding agencies and institutions where the research is performed. The DBT and DST recognize the right of researchers to publish their work in journals of their choice, because researchers are the best judges of where to publish their work. The DBT and DST expect that the recipients of funding will publish their research in high quality, peer-reviewed journals. The DBT and DST affirms the principle that the intrinsic merit of the work, and not the title of the journal in which an author's work is published, should be considered in making future funding decisions. The DBT and DST do not recommend the use of journal impact factors either as a surrogate measure of the quality of individual research articles, to assess an individual scientist's contributions, or in hiring, promotion, or funding decisions. The DBT and DST believe that maximizing the distribution of these publications by providing free online access by depositing them in an institutional repository is the most effective way of ensuring that the research it funds can be accessed, read and built upon. The digital context of the production and dissemination of knowledge makes it especially easy to make all knowledge publicly available. Further, free, open and digital access of scientific research will ensure percolation of cutting edge research at a rapid pace into higher education curricula, thereby raising the standard of technical and scientific education in the country. This in turn, will foster a richer research culture. 

4. OA in India vis-à-vis Global Trends: 
Open Access is of particular importance to the Global South because it provides an unprecedented opportunity for equitable access to essential research information from around the world. So while removing the price barrier is important, the key to Open Access is that it allows researchers and the institutions they work for to regain control of their intellectual labour and capital by disseminating the research they produce in ways that they see fit, and not simply according to the business logic of for-profit publishing houses. This will hopefully result in a more balanced production and dissemination of knowledge from around the world. With free software such as the Open Journal System, and with peer-review being performed without cost as a long-standing tradition, the cost of producing journals is far lower than commercial publishers would have us believe. The Directory of Open Access Journals now list over 8,500 titles from around the world; most do not charge an author fee. These Open Access outlets provide important opportunities for knowledge dissemination while reducing costs substantially for the libraries. Most universities in North America and Europe have set up repositories individually or as consortia, and an increasing number of higher education institutions in the Global South have also set them up to feature their faculty's research output. In addition, many universities have also set up publishing platforms such as the Open Journal Systems and other kinds of open source platforms to allow faculty to engage in Open Access publishing and other kinds of innovative digital scholarship. However, many repositories remain poorly filled because researchers are often not aware of Open Access, or they have misconceptions about it and copyright, or about quality issues associated with it, not realizing that Open Access is compatible with traditional peer review and copyright. Hence more awareness-building efforts are needed to educate researchers about the benefits of Open Access, and the limitations and unsustainability of the traditional system. In addition, a policy should be put in place to encourage researchers to deposit their research articles and materials into the repositories. Many institutions now enact either a voluntary or a mandatory policy requiring their faculty to deposit a copy of their work into the repository. It is also crucial for administrators to be better informed about the detrimental nature of adhering to the narrow use of the journal impact factor as a means of research evaluation. In 2013, the Obama administration declared that all publicly funded research would be made freely available within 12 months of publication. Research councils in the UK have recently begun to make public-funded research open to all. The European Commission is expected to do the same from January 2014. The applicability of these approaches to the Indian context, and their potential benefits, must be seriously considered by stakeholders in the country. In India, Open Access is now a key topic of discussions and engagement at many higher education institutions (including universities and deemed universities) as well as high-level research organisations, such as the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, the Department of Atomic Energy, the Indian Space Research Organisation, the Defence Research and Development Organisation, the Indian Council of Agricultural Research and the Indian Council of Medical Research. The tireless advocacy work of Subbiah Arunachalam [Chennai-based information consultant] has been instrumental in sensitising these key institutions in the Open Access debates. However, a strong national or institutional policy on Open Access is yet to be implemented. At the same time, some key institutions such as the Indian Academy of Sciences have been playing a leadership role in providing Open Access to the journals they publish, and the Indian Institute of Science has one of the longest running institutional repositories with the most content in the country. There are now over 350 Open Access journals being published by various organizations across India, but they cover mostly areas in science and medicine. Social sciences and the humanities are poorly represented. Of the close to 600 higher education institutions across India, fewer than 100 have an existing institutional repository, though many are in the planning stage. 

5. Scope of the proposed National Workshop: 
The DeLCON Consortium & NBRC are organizing a one day DeLCON National Workshop-2017 on Friday, 23rd June 2017 at NBRC Manesar during Open Access Programme. The tentative title of the Workshop is 'Strengthening Open Access Initiatives in India', and it will be held at NBRC, Manesar. The title connotes the need for concerted efforts to create a more enabling environment for OA in the country, to promote and upscale existing OA initiatives, and to encourage the development and launch of new OA programmes which will lead to establishment of a national OA policy. This can be also done by the DBT Institutions through linking multiple stakeholder groups and taking into account their concerns and views – namely researchers, librarians, archivists, publishers, technologists, and policymakers – and providing a platform for them to advocate for a common cause. The Workshop will provide a unique opportunity to stakeholders to pool their insights, identify and discuss key OA-related issues in the country as well as their own Institution, and create a roadmap for strengthening OA in India.

6. Structure of the Workshop: Beginning with a keynote address by a leading expert on open access to scientific research, the national workshop will be structured into two Technical Session. 

7. Objectives of the Workshop: The objectives of the DeLCON National Workshop are to:
  • Build awareness among the stakeholder groups and library & academic communities about the importance of OA to scientific research
  • Enable the exchange of knowledge, experiences and best practices of various organizations in the OA space
  • Contribute towards the creation of a promotional group that will promote OA at National levels of Organizations
  • Evaluate current trends and pitfalls towards the OA landscape in India
  • Progress policy recommendations for the creation of a national mandate to promote OA
  • Encourage collaborations, co-ordinations and partnerships among interested groups
8. Expected Outcomes: As a result of the National Workshop, it is expected that : 
  • OA stakeholder groups such as participating Academician members, Scientists, Faculties, Information Scientists, Nodal officers, working Library communities will appreciate the significance of OA, and will have understood the key trends, issues and challenges pertaining to the development of OA in India;
  • The innovative character and successful operation of leading OA initiatives in India will have been highlighted;
  • The collective efforts and actions behind the OA movement will be understood, and will inspire the next generation of academicians and librarians to become advocates of OA
  • Participating stakeholders will engage in a dialogue about possible partnerships and collaborative ventures
  • A set of recommendations will be developed for the creation of (a) a national OA mandate and policy framework, and (b) a general template for institutional OA policies, repositories and archives. 
9. Target Group: The national workshop will be attended by Working Professionals / Academicians, Library Communities, faculties, scientists, DeLCON Members, Library Professionals, Information Scientists.

DeLCON Consortium
About DeLCON: The 'DBT's Electronic Library Consortium (DeLCON)' is major project of the 'Department of Biotechnology (DBT)' to bring qualitative change in their research Institutions. It was launched in January, 2009 with the 10 DBT member Institutions (including DBT H.Q. & ICGEB) with a large number of high impact online journals. It is a national initiative for providing access to scholarly electronic resources including full-text and bibliographic databases in all the life science subject disciplines to DBT Institutional community. It facilitates access to high quality e-resources to DBT research Institutions in the country to improve teaching, learning and research. The access to all major e-resources was given to 10 DBT Institutions in the beginning of the year 2009. It has now been extended to new 17 more DBT Institutions in 2nd phase of extension in this year 2010 and further 07 members added in the 3rd phase of extension in the Year 2011. The 'DeLCON Consortium' provides current as well as archival access to more than 1171 core and peer-reviewed journals in different disciplines from 21 foreign publishers. The faculties, scientists, research scholars, students and project assistants of Institutions covered under DeLCON are the primary beneficiaries. 
  • About NBRC: National Brain Research Centre is the only institute in India dedicated to neuroscience research and education. Scientists and students of NBRC come from diverse academic backgrounds, including biological, computational, mathematical, physical, engineering and medical sciences, and use multidisciplinary approaches to understand the brain. Located in the foothills of the Aravali range in Manesar, Haryana, NBRC is an autonomous institute funded by the Department of Biotechnology, Government of India, and is also a Deemed University established in the year 1999.
  • About ICGEB: The International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology provides a scientific and educational environment of the highest standard and conducts innovative research in life sciences for the benefit of developing countries. It strengthens the research capability of its Members through training and funding programmes and advisory services and represents a comprehensive approach to promoting biotechnology internationally. The ICGEB extension laboratory, covering an area of over 3,720 square metres, has been created to decongest the workspace in the existing building. All of the Groups working on malaria, tuberculosis and bioinformatics have shifted to the new wing. The new Group, Synthetic Biology and Biofuel, is also placed here. ICGEB New Delhi component is located within the ICGEB Campus in South Delhi, which comprises an area of 10,000 square meters. It is situated alongside the Jawaharlal Nehru University and the Sanjay Van in a bush forest area and was established in the year 1994. 
  • About NII: The National Institute of Immunology (NII) is an autonomous institution supported by the Department of Biotechnology, Government of India. The Institute is committed to advanced research addressing the basic mechanisms involved in body's defence, host-pathogen interactions and related areas with a view to contribute to the creation of an internationally competitive intellectual knowledge base as a sustainable source of innovative futuristic modalities of potential use in health care. The mandate "to undertake, aid, promote, guide and coordinate research of high caliber in basic and applied immunology". Keenly conscious of it's role in helping create a scientific base for innovations relevant to development in India, the following research programs coalesced into four thrust areas: Immunity and Infection, Gene Regulation, Molecular Design, and Reproduction and Development. The Institute imparts long term research training leading to a PhD degree of the Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi and was established in the year 1981.
  • About NIPGR: NIPGR (formerly known as NCPGR) was established in 1998 with mandate to undertake, promote and co-ordinate research, train workers and to serve as information resource in identified aspects of plant genome to build a frontline plant genomics institution. The research programme aims to contribute to the understanding of the structure, expression and function of genes along with arrangement of genes on plant genomes and manipulation of plant genes/ genomes to breed improved varieties of food and industrial crops for high yields and of better quality products. NIPGR was established to contribute in the achievement of such hopes as a part of national effort for meeting the challenges in the midst of fast pace of international genomic research and grasping of opportunities on long-term basis. 
Registration: There is no registration fees for attending the workshop. However, only 50 seats are available. Registration shall be done on first-cum-first served basis. Registration will be closed after confirmation to 50 participants. 

Presentations: Workshop will have only invited lectures & conducted presentations by the Eminent Speakers & Experts.

For any query please contact: Dr. D.D. LAL, (Organizing Secretary): Email : delconconsortium@gmail.com; Tel.: +91-124-2845329. 

Tuesday, 30 May 2017

Bibliometrics and Scientometrics in India: An overview of studies during 1995-2014| Includes lists of Top Journals, Authors & Institutions

Bibliometrics and Scientometrics in India: An overview of studies during 1995-2014, Part I: Indian publication output and its citation impact
by K. C. Garg & H. K. Tripathi, Annals of Library and Information Studies, 64(1), 28-36. [March 2017]

Abstract: An analysis of 801 papers published in the area of bibliometrics and scientometrics during 1995-2014 indicates a steep increase in the number of papers published by Indian researchers as compared to the number of papers published during 1970-1994. This indicates a growing interest of Indian scholars in scientometrics and bibliometrics. The paper provides several reasons for this steep increase. The main focus of research is on bibliometric assessment of India and other countries followed by cross national assessment and bibliometric analysis of individual journals. CSIR-NISTADS is the top producing institute contributing about one-third (31.4%) of the total output followed by the output of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre and CSIR-NISCAIR. The distribution of citation data indicates that about one-fifth (21.7%) papers remained uncited. The paper identifies journals in which these uncited papers were published. Only 15% papers were cited more than 20 times. Most of the prolific authors as well as highly cited authors were from the institutions belonging to the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research. Among all authors B.M. Gupta (CSIR-NISTADS) produced the highest number of papers, but the impact as seen in terms of citation per paper and relative citation impact, S. Arunachalam (MSSRF) topped the list.

Monday, 29 May 2017

CfPs: International Symposium on Open Data and Innovation: Vision and Practice| 12-15 July | NSL, Beijing, China

The International Symposium on Open Data and Innovation: Vision and Practice
12-15 July 2017
Venue: National Science Library, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China


Call for Submissions

We sincerely invite all participants including speakers to contribute new and original submissions addressing theoretical and practical topics related to the general theme. Authors are welcome to submit full papers, datasets, or proposals for short presentations of recent results, work in progress, and new ideas.

All submissions shall be reviewed by at least two external independent reviewers. The final decision on a submission is made by the Co-Chairs of the Symposium, who will also select abstracts for poster presentations. A formal letter of final decision will be sent by email from the Symposium Secretariat once a submission is accepted. All accepted submission will be published in the ODI 2017 Proceedings.

Data articles
  • Metadata descriptor for datasets without size limits or disciplines
  • Metadata descriptor for knowledge organization system (KOS)
  • Metadata descriptor for any other knowledge units or research materials which could be opened and shared under a license

Scholarly articles
  • Specific topics of interests may include but not limited to:
  • Human-computer interaction
  • Social computing
  • Scholarly communication
  • Scholarly impact measurement
  • Information retrieval and behavior
  • Information organization
  • Bibliometrics, informetrics, scientometrics, webometrics and knowledgometrics
  • Social media and social network analysis
  • Evidence-based policy analysis
  • Intelligent knowledge production
  • Knowledge-driven workflow management and decision-making
  • Knowledge-driven collaboration and its management
  • Domain knowledge infrastructure with knowledge fusion and analytic data, text and knowledge miningetc
  • Other topics related to data-driven discovery
Submission Instructions

1) Length of submissions
Full Papers: length 8 to 16 pages, single-spaced, Times New Roman 11 pt. font
Short Papers: length 4 to 7 pages, single-spaced, Times New Roman 11 pt. font
Abstract: 1 to 2 pages, single-spaced, Times New Roman 11 pt. font
Poster: Size 120 cm * 80 cm

2) Language & Format: Language of this Symposium is English. All submissions must be written in proper and standard English.The format of submissions should be in line with that of given templates. Authors are highly recommended to refer to the attached samples for preparing their submissions.

3) How to Submit: To submit, please just send the submission to jdis@mail.las.ac.cn with stating that "this submission is submitted to ODI 2017".

Important Dates
  • Submission
submission deadline: June 15, 2017
Notification of acceptance: July 1, 2017

  • Registration
Registration starts: May 1, 2017
Registration closed: July 1, 2017

Tuesday, 9 May 2017

New Book | Carbon Utilization: Applications for the Energy Industry | ed by Malti Goel & M Sudhakar, Springer

Carbon Utilization: Applications for the Energy Industry
Edited by Malti Goel & M Sudhakar. Springer, Green Energy and Technology Series, 2017, ISBN 9789811033520.

Summary: With the growing threat of climate change resulting from increasing accumulation of greenhouse gases, CO2-sequestration technology is seen as an assurance for continuation of fossil fuels use in coal based economies. The book is a fervent directive for research in terrestrial, bio-sequestration and CO2 utilization options in the context of climate change. The book has a wide coverage of topics in the nineteen chapters.  Policy dilemma for energy security in India, technology options for reducing carbon footprints, capacity development in carbon capture & removal processes and role of renewable energy technology are covered. The CO2 chemical and biological conversion routes, innovative chlathrate hydrate formations to cage CO2 and CO2 injection in earth reservoirs for enhanced recovery of fuels are other research topics explained by the leading scientists and technocrats with an Indian perspective. New applications for the aluminum, steel, cement and fertilizers industries towards a low carbon growth strategy are incorporated. Bridging the gap between research & industry in CO2 utilization is a fundamental challenge, which scientific community must face. In this context the book is a valuable knowledge bank to inspire scientists, researchers from academia & industry and policy makers alike. It may well be a teaching material in Environmental Science for postgraduate courses. 

Table of Contents
Part I CO2 Emission, Sequestration and Utilization: A Policy Dilemma for Energy Security
CO2 Capture and Utilization for the Energy Industry: Outlook for Capability Development to Address Climate Change in India | Malti Goel
Adoption and Introduction of Supercritical Technology in the Power Sector and Consequential Effects in Operation, Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emission in the Present Context | V.S. Verma [Sample Chapter]
Low Carbon Technologies (LCT) and Carbon Capture & Sequestration (CCS)—Key to Green Power Mission for Energy Security and Environmental Sustainability | V.K. Sethi
Part II Terrestrial Sequestration Options for CO2 
Soil as Source and Sink for Atmospheric CO2 | Tapas Bhattacharyya, S.P. Wani, D.K. Pal and K.L. Sahrawat
Soil Carbon Stock and CO2 Flux in Different Ecosystems of North-East India | P.S. Yadava and Amrabati Thokchom
Baseline Data of Stored Carbon in Spinifex littoreus from Kadmath Island, Lakshadweep | Abhijit Mitra, J. Sundaresan, K. Syed Ali, Nabonita Pal, Upasana Datta, Ankita Mitra, Prosenjit Pramanick and Sufia Zaman
Assessment of Altitudinal Mediated Changes of CO2 Sequestration by Trees at Pachamalai Reserve Forest, Tamil Nadu, India | K. Suganthi, K. Rajiv Das, M. Selvaraj, S. Kurinji, Malti Goel and M. Govindaraju
Prospects in Mitigating Global Warming by Biomimetic Carbon Sequestration Using Recombinant Microbial Carbonic Anhydrases | T. Satyanarayana and Himadri Bose
Part III Low Carbon Growth Strategy from CO2 Utilization 
Climate Change Mitigation via Utilization of Carbon Dioxide | K. Palanivelu
Carbon Sequestration Through Solar Bioreactors: Industrial Strategies | K. Sudhakar and Ruma Arora Soni
Clathrate Hydrates: A Powerful Tool to Mitigate Greenhouse Gas | Pinnelli S.R. Prasad and Ch. V.V. Eswari
Carbon Sequestration and Utilization—India's Energy Woes | Gautam Sen
Coalbed Methane: Present Status and Scope of Enhanced Recovery Through CO2 Sequestration in India | Vinod Atmaram Mendhe, Alka D. Kamble, Mollika Bannerjee, Subhashree Mishra and Tanmay Sutay
A Low-Carbon Growth Strategy for India: Synergies from Oxy-Combustion, Carbon Capture, and ECBM | Thomas Weber
Part IV Current Research and Green Technology Perspective for Industry 
Carbon Dioxide Management—Aluminium Industry Perspective | Anupam Agnihotri, Suchita Rai and Nitin Warhadpande
Bioenergy Combined with Carbon Capture Potential by Microalgae at Flue Gas-Based Carbon Sequestration Plant of NALCO as Accelerated Carbon Sink | Ranjan R. Pradhan, Rati R. Pradhan, Siddhanta Das, Brajesh Dubey and Animesh Dutta
Current and Future Trends Toward Reduction of CO2 Emission from Steel Industries | Santanu Sarkar and Supriya Sarkar
Carbon Emissions and Their Mitigation in the Cement Sector | Shashank Bishnoi
Aqueous NH3 in CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Thermal Power Plant Flue Gas: N-Fertilizer Production Potential and GHG Emission Mitigation | Amitava Bandyopadhyay



Monday, 1 May 2017

Just Released | International Cooperation for Registration of Medicines: Opportunities for India

International Cooperation for Registration of Medicines: Opportunities for India
by Vasudha Wattal, Pallavi Joshi, Aashna Arora, and Ali Mehdi. ICRIER Health Policy Initiatives, and Academic Foundation, New Delhi, ISBN: 9789332704251. 

Summary: To tackle the rising burden of disease, disability and premature deaths, the demand for newer and better treatment is more than ever. Drug registration is a critical step for the introduction of medicines in a country. There has been a great deal of international interaction and cooperation in the area of public health, particularly since the conception of the Millennium Development Goals. However, international cooperation vis-à-vis mechanisms to achieve shared goals of public health are still very limited. Regulation of drugs, more specifically drug registration, is one such neglected area. This report, the first-of-its-kind, based on extensive desk and field research in 4 Indian states - Maharashtra, Karnataka, Gujarat and Telangana - and 7 countries - USA, UK, Switzerland, Germany, South Africa, Singapore and Indonesia - incorporates views of more than 150 stakeholders to identify lessons as well as opportunities for the Government of India in its effort to address challenges of drug regulation in particular, and public health more generally, in the country.


Table of Content

1. Introduction

2. Research Methodology

3. Analysis of Drug Registration Procedures and International Cooperation Initiatives

4. Cross-Country Implications for Stakeholders

5. A Game Theoritic Approach to Understanding International Cooperation

6. Policy Recommendations

7. Conclusion

Saturday, 29 April 2017

Just Released | Challenges and Prospects for Clinical Trials in India: A Regulatory Perspective

Challenges and Prospects for Clinical Trials in India: A Regulatory Perspective
by Rahul Mongia, Deepmala Pokhriyal, Seema Rao and Ali Mehdi. ICRIER Health Policy Initiatives, and Academic Foundation, New Delhi, ISBN: 9789332704268. 

Summary: Clinical trials are integral to drug discovery and bringing out newer and better medicines. With the evolution of India's disease burden as well as its pharmaceutical industry, the need for clinical trials has increased manifold. This report analyses prospects and challenges of clinical trials in India, focusing on New Chemical Entities and new drugs, and likewise proposes actionable policy recommendations for the Indian drug regulatory landscape so that the country can realize its untapped potential, while addressing concerns raised regarding the conduct and quality of clinical trials. The Government of India needs to develop a promotive ecosystem around clinical trials now more than ever, sooner rather than later. A clear set of policy, rules and guidelines around clinical trials would be a central component in the larger strategy to address India's public health challenges and incentivize the country's pharmaceutical industry to mature to the next level.


Table of Content

1. Introduction

2. Research Methodology

3. The Dilemmas Afflicting Clinical Research in India

4. Under Trial: The Challenges of Clinical Trials in India

5. Conclusions



Wednesday, 26 April 2017

Just Released | The United Nations World Water Development Report 2017 - Wastewater: The Untapped Resource

The United Nations World Water Development Report 2017 - Wastewater: The Untapped Resource
by WWAP (United Nations World Water Assessment Programme).  Paris, UNESCO, 2017, ISBN: 9789231002014.

Abstract: The 2017 edition of the United Nations WWDR, the forth in a series of annual, theme-oriented reports, addresses an often overlooked issue that is critical to water resources management and the provision of basic water-related services: wastewater. Maximizing wastewater's potential as a valuable and sustainable resource requires creation of enabling environment for change, including suitable legal and regulatory framework, appropriate financing mechanisms and social acceptance. With a political will to do so the current obstacles, such as lack of knowledge, capacity, data and information on wastewater, can be effectively overcome.

Summary: Most human activities that use water produce wastewater. As the overall demand for water grows, the quantity of wastewater produced and its overall pollution load are continuously increasing worldwide. Over 80% of the world's wastewater – and over 95% in some least developed countries – is released to the environment without treatment.
Once discharged into water bodies, wastewater is either diluted, transported downstream or infiltrates into aquifers, where it can affect the quality (and therefore the availability) of freshwater supplies. The ultimate destination of wastewater discharged into rivers and lakes is often the ocean with negative consequences for the marine environment.
The 2017 edition of the United Nations World Water Development Report, entitled "Wastewater: The Untapped Resource", demonstrates how improved wastewater management generates social, environmental and economic benefits essential for sustainable development and is essential to achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
In particular, the Report seeks to inform decision-makers, government, civil society and private sector, about the importance of managing wastewater as an undervalued and sustainable source of water, energy, nutrients and other recoverable by-products, rather than something to be disposed of or a nuisance to be ignored.
The report's title reflects the critical role that wastewater is poised to play in the context of a circular economy, whereby economic development is balanced with the protection of natural resources and environmental sustainability, and where a cleaner and more sustainable economy has a positive effect on the water quality.
Improved wastewater management generates social, environmental and economic benefits, and is essential to achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.


Table of Content

Foreword | by Irina Bokova, Director-General of UNESCO

Foreword | by Guy Ryder, Chair of UN-Water and Director-General of International Labour Organization

Preface | by Stefan Uhlenbrook, WWAP Coordinator and Richard Connor, Editor-in-Chief

Executive Summary

Prologue | State Of Water Resources: Availability and Quality

Part I Baseline and Context

Chapter 1 | Introduction | 1.1 Wastewater flows | 1.2 Wastewater as a resource: Seizing the opportunities

Chapter 2 | Wastewater and The Sustainable Development Agenda | 2.1 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development | 2.2 Potential synergies and conflicts

Chapter 3 | Governance | 3.1 Actors and roles | 3.2 Policy, law and regulation | 3.3 Financing | 3.4 Socio-cultural aspects

Chapter 4 | Technical Aspects Of Wastewater | 4.1 Wastewater sources and components | 4.2 Impacts of releasing untreated or inadequately treated wastewater | 4.3 Wastewater collection and treatment | 4.4 Data and information needs

Part II Thematic Focus

Chapter 5 | Municipal and Urban Wastewater | 5.1 Urbanization and its impact on wastewater production | 5.2 Urban forms | 5.3 Sources of wastewater in municipal and urban systems | 5.4 Composition of municipal and urban wastewater | 5.5 Urban form and the potential for municipal and urban wastewater use | 5.6 Managing urban runoff

Chapter 6 | Industry | 6.1 Extent of industrial wastewater generation | 6.2 Nature of industrial wastewater | 6.3 Addressing the resource challenge | 6.4 Wastewater and sustainable industrial development

Chapter 7 | Agriculture | 7.1 Agriculture as a source of water pollution | 7.2 Agriculture as a user of wastewater

Chapter 8 | Ecosystems | 8.1 The role and limits of ecosystems in wastewater management | 8.2 Planned use of wastewater for ecosystem services | 8.3 Operational and policy aspects

Part III Regional Aspects

Chapter 9 | Africa | 9.1 Water and wastewater in Sub-Saharan Africa | 9.2 Critical challenges | 9.3 The way forward

Chapter 10 | The Arab Region | 10.1 Context | 10.2 Challenges | 10.3 Responses

Chapter 11 | Asia and The Pacific | 11.1 Context and challenges | 11.2 Building resilient infrastructure | 11.3 A systems approach to wastewater by-product recovery | 11.4 Regulatory and capacity needs

Chapter 12 | Europe and North America | 12.1 Context | 12.2 Challenges | 12.3 Responses |

Chapter 13 | Latin America and The Caribbean | 13.1 The urban wastewater challenge | 13.2 Recent expansion of urban wastewater treatment | 13.3 Ongoing concerns and expanding opportunities | 13.4 Benefits of urban wastewater treatment | 13.5 Other sources of wastewater | 13.6 Lessons learned

Part IV Response Options

Chapter 14 | Preventing and Reducing Wastewater Generation and Pollution Loads At The Source | 14.1 Mechanisms for controlling and monitoring pollution | 14.2 Technical responses | 14.3 Financial approaches and behavioural change

Chapter 15 | Enhancing Wastewater Collection and Treatment | 15.1 Sewers and waterborne sanitation | 15.2 Low-cost sewerage | 15.3 Combined sewerage | 15.4 Decentralized treatment (DEWATS) | 15.5 Decentralized stormwater management | 15.6 Evolution of treatment technologies | 15.7 Sewer mining and component separation

Chapter 16 | Water Reuse and Resource Recovery | 16.1 Beneficial reuse of water | 16.2 Resource recovery from wastewater and biosolids | 16.3 Business models and economic approaches | 16.4 Minimizing risks to human health and the environment | 16.5 Regulations for water reuse | 16.6 Social acceptance of wastewater use

Chapter 17 | Knowledge, Innovation, Research and Capacity Development | 17.1 Trends in research and innovation | 17.2 Knowledge, research, technology and capacity-building gaps | 17.3 Future trends in wastewater management | 17.4 Capacity building, public awareness and collaboration among stakeholders |

Chapter 18 | Creating An Enabling Environment | 18.1 Technical options | 18.2 Legal and institutional frameworks | 18.3 Financing opportunities | 18.4 Enhancing knowledge and building capacity | 18.5 Mitigating human and environmental health risks | 18.6 Fostering social acceptance | 18.7 Coda



Friday, 21 April 2017

INDIGO Policy Brief: Science, Technology and Innovation, Comparative Analysis between EU-India and Other Countries: Indian Perspective | by V. V. Krishna & Rajiv Mishra, CSSP, JNU

Policy Brief: Science, Technology and Innovation, Comparative Analysis between EU-India and Other Countries: Indian Perspective
by V. V. Krishna with the assistance of Rajiv Mishra, CSSP, JNU.
INDIGO Policy, Centre for Social Innovation (ZSI), Austria, 2017.

Table of Contents
Introduction
1 Setting the context and background of the comparative analysis
2 Some comparisons between the EU multilateral and the non-EU bilateral cooperation from an Indian perspective
3 Gaps in comparative perspective of the EU multilateral and the non-EU bilateral Science and Technology cooperation
4 Comparative perspective on cooperation of Indian funding organisations with other countries
5 Gaps in comparative perspective of the EU funding and the non-EU countries funding mechanisms
6 Good practices of cooperation as seen from the Indian perspective | 6.1 India-United States S&T collaboration | 6.2 India-France S&T collaboration | 6.3 Indo-German S&T collaboration
7 Interviews with Indian funding organisations cooperating with Europe: Correlation with gaps analysis
8 Future of India-European Union Science and Technology cooperation: Key recommendations of comparative analysis


INDIGO Policy Brief: India Science and Technology Cooperation with EU and Other Select Countries | by V. V. Krishna & Rajiv Mishra, CSSP, JNU

Policy Brief: India Science and Technology Cooperation with EU and Other Select Countries
by V. V. Krishna with the assistance of Rajiv Mishra, CSSP, JNU.
INDIGO Policy, Centre for Social Innovation (ZSI), Austria, 2017.

Table of Contents
Introduction
1 EU-India Science, Technology and Innovation cooperation
2 India-US Science, Technology and Innovation cooperation
3 India-Japan Science, Technology and Innovation cooperation
4 India-Canada Science, Technology and Innovation cooperation
5 India-China Science, Technology and Innovation cooperation
6 Concluding summary



INDIGO Policy Brief: Science, Technology and Innovation Policy in India - Some Recent Changes | by V. V. Krishna, CSSP, JNU

Policy Brief: Science, Technology and Innovation Policy in India - Some Recent Changes
by V. V. Krishna, CSSP, JNU
INDIGO Policy, Centre for Social Innovation (ZSI), Austria, 2017.

Table of Contents
Foreword
Introduction
1 Some general features | 1.1 Structure of gross expenditure on Research and Development (GERD) | 1.2 Structure of S & T research system governance |  1.3 Main research performers | 1.4 Intermediary organisations |1.5 Cluster organisations | 1.6 Knowledge production
2 Methodology
3 Evolution of India's Science, Technology and Innovation policy | 3.1 Science, Technology and Innovation policy 2013
4 New government and current changes of STI 2015 | 4.1 National flagship programmes | 4.2 New Research and Innovation policies, schemes and instruments 2014–2015
5 Possible impacts on STI cooperation with Europe


IIED Working Paper "India's Peri-Urban Frontier: Rural-Urban Transformations and Food Security" | by F Marshall & P Randhawa

India's Peri-Urban Frontier: Rural-Urban Transformations and Food Security
by Fiona Marshall and Pritpal Randhawa
IIED Working Paper, 2017, ISBN 9781784313814.

Abstract: In India, peri-urban areas are too often neglected. Many people live in poverty and face increasing marginalisation and food insecurity. Yet peri-urban agriculture could be a major contributor to poverty alleviation and food security. This working paper examines rural-urban transformations in India in relation to changes in food production, access, consumption, nutritional quality and safety. To improve health and nutrition, a more holistic, food security-based perspective is needed. Policy and planning must support those fragile communities engaged in peri-urban agriculture while protecting the environmental services on which they depend. It also discusses examples of specific policies and programmes and considers knowledge gaps, governance challenges and mechanisms that might help facilitate pro-poor food security developments on the ground.


Tuesday, 18 April 2017

Call for Applications - DST Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy PostDoctoral Fellowships

DST Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy PostDoctoral Fellowships


Background and Motivation
Science, Technology, and Innovation (STI) are now recognized as playing a significant role in advancing human, social, and economic development and meeting the aspirations of people and nations across the world. As a result, understanding STI processes and exploring ways to strengthen them is a major strand of intellectual activity, evinced by the explosion of literature on these topics in the last decade. At the same time, there are significant efforts to link this understanding to better policy making by a range of governmental agencies (both in developed and emerging economies) and inter-governmental organizations.
In recognition of importance and potential of STI in meeting India's developmental challenges through "acceleration of the pace of discovery and delivery of science-lead solutions for faster, sustainable and inclusive growth," the government launched the Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy in 2013. Department of Science and Technology (DST) recognized the importance of evidence-driven research and analysis in underpinning the effective achievement of the objectives of this policy and established DST Centers for Policy Research (CPRs) in various academic institutions across the country (Annexure-I). These centers are engaged in targeted research in number of key areas relevant to the country, train young scholars in STI policy research, and contribute towards better STI policy making by providing inputs to DST.
The role of suitable human resources is key to the success of STI policy research enterprise, perhaps even more than many traditional areas of research since intellectual engagement with this area ideally requires both understanding of the STI domain and processes, as well as policy research skills that draw on various strands of social sciences. Thus individuals with a background in natural science, medicine engineering or social science with a background of STI policy research are particularly suited for such research and, if trained appropriately, can bring a unique and important perspective to impending issues in this arena.

Fellowship Proposal
As the country is lagging behind in terms of critical mass and proper structure of policy research institution(s), on the recommendation of the Committee of Experts, Policy Research Cell of DST had announced in 2016 a DST-STI Policy Fellowship Programme at post-doctoral level to generate a critical mass of policy researchers. At present, there is no systematic formal pathway in the country to support such a professional transition, although personal experiences of many established STI policy researchers suggest that there is indeed a cohort of young graduates who have an interest in making such transition and contribute systematically to STI policy-making in the country. The fellowship programme was initiated with the broad objective of (a) enhancing human resources that can engage with and contribute to the STI policy domain and (b) strengthen the knowledge base, think tank, and evidence based policy making. The fellowship may provide an opportunity to develop the skills for young scientists and engineers who are interested in engagement with the STI policy domain and/or as STI policy researchers. This programme aims to attract and encourage top-quality researchers to work on the issues pertaining to STI policy and contribute their knowledge and analytical skills in the policy realm.

It is proposed to call for DST-STI Policy Fellowship- 2017 at POSTDOCTORAL Level. The Fellowship program would also provide an opportunity for policy-makers in various government departments /agencies to draw upon STI policy research expertise from this pool.
DST-STI POSTDOCTORAL FELLOW: The main objective of DST-STI Fellowship is to build up the cadre of academic STI policy researchers in the country, such that these Fellows may actively contribute in policy making in academia, research organizations, or even in government. The candidates who have received a Ph.D. (or equivalent) in natural science /medicine/engineering/ policy research/social science (with a background of STI policy research) within the last three years will be eligible to apply for the fellowship. Applicants must be capable of doing independent research work and have published at least 3 research papers in peer reviewed journals. At the time of application, applicant's age should be below 35 years. 
This will be a 2-year fellowship (with a possible extension of one more year, depending upon performance) where the recipient would be located in a DST-CPR (by mutual agreement) or in an active policy research group in academic/research institutions within the country to undertake STI policy research align to the research program of that CPR or mutually agreed with consent of DST-PRC and policy researchers/mentors in other than that of CPR. They also will build active linkages to a relevant government agency (either a scientific ministry or a line ministry with an S&T component), facilitated by DST itself and/or the DST-CPR. It is hoped that over a time, as policy makers realize the importance of such Fellows, they will be forthcoming to support such Fellows and even host them. In addition to undertaking research and policy engagement, there will be a set of activities – such as a seminar series or topical workshops – developed by the DST-CPRs (in consultation with DST) – that will further add value to the experience gained by Fellows and also build a community for them.

Eligibility
Science/medicine/engineering/ social science (with a background of STI policy) academic scholars, STI policy researchers, with good academic record and holding a Ph.D. degree (within the last three years) are eligible to apply. Applicants must be capable of doing independent research work and have published at least 3 research papers in peer reviewed journals. At the time of application, applicant's age should be below 35 years.

Application/Proposal
Applicants are required to submit following documents written in English:
  • Research Proposal: A proposal of maximum 5 pages on empirical research on STI policy issues, preferably, the issues pertaining to thematic areas of the candidates' desired DST-CPR and/or other Policy Research Group in academic/research institutions (proposal must be formulated though consultation with DST-CPR or active policy research group). The proposal must include: a) a STI related research title, b) a research objective, c) STI related Policy research background/ questions, d) research methodologies, and e) a research plan, including the evidence based outcome. 
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Two recommendation letters.
The remuneration and terms and conditions will be guided as per applicable rules, of DST. The fellowship programme will be run by Policy Research Cell, DST. The duly constituted Review Committee comprising others scientific departments/ ministries representatives as well eminent policy makers, academicians will select the fellows, monitor the progress and make further review of the fellowship programme. 

Selection/Support
The duly constituted Review Committee will select candidates based on their research track record and the relevance, quality, and significance of their proposals. Once the Review Committee finalizes the selection, the program office (Policy Research Cell, DST) will notify a review result to selectees via e-mail. The selected Postdoctoral Fellows will be awarded a fellowship of Rs. 80,000/- (consolidated) in the level of INSPIRE Faculty. Based on the Committee's decision, an amount up to Rs. 200,000/- will be granted annually to the Postdoctoral Fellows to cover researchrelated costs and contingency.
Number Postdoctoral Fellowships: 8 (tentative and can be increased, decreased at the discretion of DST)
 
How to apply: Candidates are required to submit a copy of application in prescribed format available at DST website www.dst.gov.in. The envelope should be superscribed with "DST-STI-PFP Application 2017". The application should be sent to Dr. Akhilesh Mishra, Scientist D, Department of Science and Technology, Technology Bhawan, New Mehrauli Road, New Delhi-110016 by speed post. A soft copy of proposal should also be mailed at akhilesh.mishra@nic.in. (Applicants may note that R&D related proposals will not be considered. Proposal must be on STI policy related issues) 

Last Date of Submission: 30th May, 2017. 

ANNEXURE -1
DST- Centres for Science Policy Research
  1. DST- Centre for Policy Research at IISc-Bangalore | Prof. T. A. Abinandanan, Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560 012 | Email:abinandanan@gmail.com abinand@materials.iisc.ernet.in.  | Thematic Areas of Policy Research:  1. Scientometric Analysis of Indian Institutions. 2. Research on Funding Patterns and Policies. 3. Methods of Assessing Multi-Dimensional Impact
  2. DST- Centre for Policy Research" at IIT-Delhi | Prof. Ambuj Sagar, Coordinator, DST- Centre for Policy Research at IIT-Delhi, Indian Institute of Technology Hauz Khas, New Delhi-110 016, Email: asagar@hss.iitd.ac.in. | Thematic Areas of Policy Research:  1. India's Innovation Mapping. 2. Technology Transfer. 3. Sectorial research study. 4. Benchmarking study reports
  3. DST- Centre for Policy Research in S&T Entrepreneurship "Entrepreneurship Development Institute of India (EDII)" Gandhinagar | Prof. S. B. Sareen, Entrepreneurship Development Institute of India (EDII), P.O. Bhat 382 428, Gandhinagar, Gujarat Email: sareen@ediindia.org. | Thematic Areas of Policy Research:  1. Understating ecosystem to promote and strengthen S&T Entrepreneurship. 2. Scan International Strategy to promote S&T based Entrepreneurship and integrating inclusive growth element. 3. Prospects and Constraints in Technology Commercialization by R&D Institutions in India: The Strategy Imperatives. 4. Maintaining data base of high technology entrepreneurs and preparing and publishing case studies of such entrepreneurs.
  4. DST- Centre for Policy Research" at Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar (Central) University, Lucknow | Dr. Venkatesh Dutta, Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University (A Central University), Rae Bareily Road, Vidya Vihar, Lucknow – 226 025 (UP), Tel. (+091 522) 2440826/27, 2441515, 2551615, Fax:091-522-2440821, E-mail: dvenks@gmail.com, duttada@yahoo.co.in, Mob:+91-9918466778. | Thematic Areas of Policy Research:  1. Study of policies and mechanisms for delivery of STI outputs to diverse stakeholders including innovation for social inclusion with special reference to: Sustainable agriculture; Health; Energy; Water resource management and Climate governance. 2. Map STI effectiveness in bringing social inclusion. 
  5. DST- Centre for Policy Research" at Panjab University, Chandigarh | Prof. R Tewari, Coordinator, DST- Centre for Policy Research Panjab University, Sector 14, Chandigarh, UT- 160014, Email: rupinder@pu.ac.in, dstprc2014@pu.ac.in. | Thematic Areas of Policy Research:  1. Study of policies and mechanisms that could promote to enhance and expand private sector participation in STI activities including industry - academia - R&D collaboration. 2. Motivation and promotion of IP generation as a tool for enhanced Academia industry collaborations. 



Saturday, 1 April 2017

New Report | Better Business, Better World: The Report of the Business & Sustainable Development Commission

Better Business, Better World: The Report of the Business & Sustainable Development Commission

by Business & Sustainable Development Commission, 2017.

Summary
A call to action to business leaders to align with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This report shows how the next decade will be critical for companies to open 60 key market "hot spots", tackle social, environmental challenges, and re-build trust with society.

Table of Contents
The Commissioners | The Challenge
Executive Summary | The Business Case for the Global Goals | Leading for Sustainable development | Making the Choice
1. Introduction: The Global Goals and Why They Matter for Business
1.1 The Global Goals for Sustainable Development | 1.2 The Global Goals need business: business needs the Global Goals
2. Major Market Opportunities Opened up by Delivering the Global Goals 
2.1 The 60 fastest-growing sustainable market opportunities | 2.2 Opportunities by economic system | 2.3 Progress on all the Global Goals is needed to deliver all the benefits | 2.4 Pricing of externalities would increase the value of market opportunities | 2.5 Geographic distribution of opportunities | 2.6 The impact on jobs
3. Leading for Better Business and a Better World 
3.1 Sustainability is already good business | 3.2 Innovative businesses are already capturing Global Goals opportunities | 3.3 Transforming the way business operates for better business and a better world | 3.4 Gaining commitment from CEOs and boards | 3.5 Incorporating the Global Goals into business strategy | 3.6 Accelerating sectoral shifts to sustainable competition by working with peers | 3.7 Shaping public policy
4. Sustainable Finance
4.1 Simplifying reporting of environment, social and governance (ESG) performance | 4.2 Unlocking infrastructure investment | 4.3 Aligning regulation with investment 
5. Renewing the Social Contract
5.1 An uncertain outlook for employment | 5.2 Providing decent work and more jobs | 5.3 Providing training and skills | 5.4 Forging a new social contract | 5.5 Actions for business | 5.6 Actions for governments | 5.7 Actions for civil society | 
6. Conclusion 
6.1 Actions for sustainable business leaders | 6.2 Actions for the Commission


New Report | Delivering the Sustainable Development Goals: Seizing the Opportunity in Global Manufacturing | by PwC, GMIS and UNIDO, 2017

Delivering the Sustainable Development Goals: Seizing the Opportunity in Global Manufacturing

by PwC, GMIS and UNIDO, 2017.

Executive Summary
This white paper, developed jointly by PwC, GMIS and UNIDO, sets out the business imperative for manufacturing businesses of achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and why global manufacturing organisations must align their strategy with the SDGs. 
Of course businesses cannot achieve the SDGs by themselves. That is not their role. That is the role of government. But individual businesses – including global manufacturers - can help (or hinder) governments in achieving them. 
Governments will also turn to business to help them achieve the SDGs, not primarily through donations or philanthropic activity (although that will help too), but by reviewing and seeking inputs that help shape government policies and procedures impacting businesses. 
For global manufacturing players, this means (a) recognising the relevance of the SDGs to their business activities, and then (b) moving away from "business-as-usual" in the way they deliver and create products and services. 
Manufacturers should look closely at the targets that underpin SDG goals 7, 8, 9, 12 and 13 in particular, as these may well be where their greatest opportunities (and their biggest contribution) lie. UNIDO, which focuses particularly on SDG 9, believes that the structural shift toward more innovation and technology-oriented industrial activities will significantly change the nature of competition, redefine work and redraw traditional industrial boundaries. As such, the arrival of the new industrial revolution promises considerable opportunities for inclusive and sustainable development for manufacturers as they align their business models with the achievement of the SDGs.
The recent 'Better Business, Better World' report revealed that pursuing sustainable and inclusive business models could unlock economic opportunities worth at least US$12 trillion a year by 2030 and generate up to 380 million jobs, mostly in developing countries. But the total economic prize from implementing the Global Goals could be two to three times larger still, assuming that the benefits are captured across the whole economy and accompanied by much higher labour and resource productivity.

Table of Contents
Executive Summary
Foreword - Introducing the SDGs - Driving Sustainable Change
1. The SDGs - the Role of Governments | Governments around the world are getting serious about the SDGs | CEOs recognise the significance of a government agenda | Forging partnerships for the SDGs – a government perspective | So how is the United Arab Emirates government approaching the SDGs? | Where business can partner with governments on the SDGs
2. The SDGs – the Role of Business | No more business-as-usual – why the SDGs matter for business | The 17 SDGs, and the 169 targets that underpin them, are a blueprint | Outlining the opportunities - the SDGs as competitive advantage | Citizens worldwide believe that business is about profit…and more besides | Making the SDGs relevant for leaders and for other corporate functions.
3. The SDGs – Opportunities for Global Manufacturing Businesses | The manufacturing industry worldwide | Manufacturing and the SDGs | Which SDGs matter most for manufacturers? | Connecting the SDGs | So what are the biggest SDG-related opportunities for manufacturers?
4. Conclusions | Aligning with the SDGs is a major opportunity for both manufacturers and governments
Annex A – achieving key targets for SDGs 7, 8, 9, 12, and 13



Thursday, 30 March 2017

UGC-GIAN Course on Patent, Specialized Licenses and Issues, 13-17 April | National Law University, Jodhpur, India

Call for Participation

UGC-GIAN Course on Patent, Specialized Licenses and Issues
13-17 April 2017. 
Venue: National Law University, Jodhpur, India


All information about official formalities are mentioned in the Brochure.


With Best Regards

Dr. Gargi Chakrabarti
Associate Professor
Coordinator, IPR Chair
National Law University, Jodhpur, India